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Madness in the moonlight

Moonlight Madness brings locals to the square for savings

GTNS photos by Gretchen Teske

Shops around Washington’s square were open to customers for a special shopping event on Thursday, Oct. 18.
GTNS photos by Gretchen Teske Shops around Washington’s square were open to customers for a special shopping event on Thursday, Oct. 18.
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A cool 60 degrees and a slight breeze were the perfect setting for a little Moonlight Madness on Washington’s square Thursday night.

The event, sponsored by the Washington Chamber, has been going on for about five years and encourages local customers and businesses to have sales as a way of encouraging people to get downtown and enjoy everything Washington has to offer. Event coordinator Alisha Davis said the ability to host events like this is what makes Washington so special for retailers and customers alike.

“It helps them to find out all the cute little shops we have and restaurants and just how beautiful it is right now in fall,” she said. “I think when you come to downtown Washington it’s going to be different from going to a mall, because everybody is so nice and willing to help. We just have that personal touch here downtown.”

Greeting people by name was owner of Wolf Floral, Laura Bombei. She said her store has been participating in the event since its conception. Bombei said her store is not normally open on Thursday evenings but by the chamber hosting an event, she was able to be open for the special occasion and open her store to new possible customers.

“It’s a good way to show everyone what Washington has,” she said. “Hopefully it brings people out to show what makes each store unique and maybe they can keep that in mind for Christmas presents.”

Across the square, Elisabeth Tinnes, owner of the Joy of Music, was hoping to bring customers in for just that reason. The primary focus of her business is music therapy but she hoped by being open that people would come in to see the instruments she had to offer and keep her store in mind during the Christmas season.

“If they come in they can say look at all these options or look at these things that I could get,” she said. “(They can) get something creative or something they wouldn’t normally have.”